Guides and Slides

Guides are lesson plans that residents can read to help organize their thoughts around a subject and generate content to teach. These are not meant to be comprehensive, but they provide a starter set of teaching material to build upon. These can also serve as learning material that can be easily digested by junior Neurology residents during call shifts. Slides are presentations designed to be displayed on a computer screen or tablet computer wherever and whenever a teaching session happens. These are meant to be props and visual aids to facilitate teaching and provide flow and organization for a lesson. These structured lessons are designed to be relatively short, ranging from 1 to 15 minutes in duration, to allow for teaching in the brief moments between clinical duties and scheduled residency and clerkship activities.

Emergency Management of Stroke

The management of a Code Stroke is a basic skill for all Neurology residents and for general Neurologists who cover the Emergency Department or inpatients. This slide provides a brief overview of the decision pathways involved in guiding the care of patients presenting with acute neurologic symptoms that might represent an acute stroke or hemorrhage. This is designed for Neurology residents as well as for students and rotating residents and interns who may be involved in the management of acute stroke.

Slides (PDF)

References:

[1] Gross H, Sung G, Weingart SD, and Smith WS. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Acute Ischemic Stroke. Neurocrit Care. 2012; 17:S29-S36. (basic protocols)

Emergency Management of Status Epilepticus

The management of status epilepticus is a basic skill for all Neurology residents, for general Neurologists who cover the Emergency Department or inpatients, and for Emergency Medicine physicians. This slide provides an overview of the thought processes behind the typical protocols used for the treatment of this condition and the questions that clinicians should ask themselves when managing seizures. This is designed for Neurology residents as well as for students and rotating residents and interns who may be involved in the management of seizures.

Slides (PDF)

References:

[1] Brophy GM, Bell R, Claassen J, Alldredge B, Bleck TP, Glauser T, et al. Guidelines for the Evaluation and Management of Status Epilepticus. Neurocrit Care. 2012;17(1):3-23. (basic protocol structure, anticonvulsant dosing)

[2] Claasen J, Silbergleit R, Weingart SD, and Smith WS. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Status Epilepticus. Neurocrit Care. 2012;17:S73-S78. (basic protocol structure, anticonvulsant dosing)

[3] Chen JWY, and Westerlain, CG. Status epilepticus: pathophysiology and management in adults. Lancet Neurol. 2006;5:246-256. (pathophysiology, alternative dosing)

Emergency Management of Spinal Cord Compression

Spinal cord compression is a neurologic emergency, and Neurologists are often called upon in this setting to help diagnosis this condition and advise on the appropriate course of action. It is important for Neurology residents, general Neurologists who cover the Emergency Department or inpatients, Emergency Medicine physicians, Internal Medicine physicians and Surgeons to recognize the typical presentations and the differential diagnosis. This is designed for Neurology residents, students, and rotating residents and interns who may be asked to evaluate patients with potential spinal cord compression.

Slides (PDF)

References:

[1] Samuels MA, editor. Manual of Neurologic Therapeutics. 7th ed. Philadelphia (PA): Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2004. (presentations and treatment of back pain, spinal metastases, spinal trauma)

[2] Tarulli A. Neurology: A Clinician’s Approach. 1st edition. New York: Cambridge University Press; 2011.

Emergency Management of Increased Intracranial Pressure

The management of increased intracranial pressure is the central principle of Neurology critical care and is an essential skill for Neurology residents and general Neurologists facing emergent consultations. This slide provides a brief overview of the key principles of increased ICP presentations and management and the use of hyperosmolar therapy. This is designed for Neurology residents as well as for students and rotating residents and interns who may be involved in the management of increased ICP.

Slides (PDF)

References:

[1] Mangat, HS. Severe Traumatic Brain Injury. Continuum Lifelong Learning Neurol. 2012;18(3).

[2] Fink, ME. Osmotherapy for Intracranial Hypertension: Mannitol Versus Hypertonic Saline. Continuum Lifelong Learning Neurol. 2012;18(3).

Paraneoplastic Syndromes

There are many different effects that paraneoplastic syndromes can have on each part of the neurologic system. While paraneoplastic syndromes are rare, they are sometimes harbingers for malignancies. This is designed for Neurology residents as well as for students and rotating residents and interns who seek to gain familiarity with the wide range of neurologic paraneoplastic syndromes and the associated cancers and autoantibodies.

Slides (PDF)

References:

[1] Dalmau JO, and Posner JB. Paraneoplastic Syndromes. Neurol Rev. 1999;56(4):405-408. (association of cancers, autoantibodies, and presentations)

[2] Nath U, and Grant R. Neurological paraneoplastic syndromes. J Clin Pathol. 1997;50:975-980. (association of cancers, autoantibodies, and presentations)

[3] Honnorat J, and Antoine JC. Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes. Orphanet J Rare Diseases. 2007;2(22):22-30.

Thunderclap Headaches

The clinical syndrome of sudden onset severe headaches has a differential that includes both rapidly lethal and benign etiologies. This presentation familiarizes the learner with different etiologies of thunderclap headache and categorization methods that help organize the differential into a more memorable format.

Guide (PDF)

Slides (PDF)

Slides (Keynote)

Slides (Powerpoint)

Taking a History in an Adult Patient with Seizures

There are several important components of a comprehensive history obtained from a patient with seizures that help improve the clarification and management of that patient’s disease. This presentation helps guide the learner in obtaining a detailed and structured history from a patient with suspected or known seizures.

Guide (PDF)

Slides (PDF)

Slides (Keynote)

Slides (Powerpoint)

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